Week 5 Discussion

Week 5 Discussion:

Comparing CBT in Group, Family, and Individual Settings

Cognitive-behavioral therapy has been used in the management of various mental disorders to correct behavior, improve stress management, and enhance mental health (Nakao et al., 2021). This psychotherapeutic treatment helps individuals identify and shun unhealthy thoughts, hence improving balanced thinking and coping. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) techniques have proved effective when used among patients with anxiety disorders, depression, ADHD, bulimia, smoking, and gambling (Nakao et al., 2021). This post discusses how the implementation of CBT varies in individual, group, and family settings.

Individual CBT offers patients opportunities for individualized therapy to address their specific needs (Guo et al., 2021). This differs from group CBT, which simultaneously offers interventions to a group of patients. Group CBT offers more opportunities for therapeutic peer modeling, social or peer support, normalization, learning from the experiences of others, and behavior reinforcement (Guo et al., 2021). Besides, group CBT saves resources; hence, it is cost-effective. Group CBT is more cost-effective than individual CBT because clients can better share feelings and thoughts to foster interpersonal cooperation (Moloud et al., 2022).

Family CBT involves family members helping address a family-level problem, such as conflicts and poor communication, to reduce symptoms and improve quality of life. Members of a family participating in CBT have a shared understanding of the treatment goals and a strong desire to support them. With family CBT, members can easily support each other to understand psychoeducation delivered on a specific challenge, share knowledge, and understand how to support each other. Involving family in CBT has been associated with better outcomes than individual settings.

In the weeks resources, the therapist explained that in CBT for couples, the therapist has two perspectives to consider. First, it is about focusing on what people have control over. For example, a spouse learns she can control her behavior and how she interprets her husband’s behavior (Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, 2018). As a result, the other spouse may not be able to control one’s behavior or response to another spouse’s behavior. Thus, a spouse understands she cannot control her husband’s behavior but can only have some influence. Another difference seen in couple CBT with other forms is that a couple can practice communication techniques between themselves, such as empathy, paraphrasing, and assertiveness (Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, 2018). Another difference is the presence of someone who can help the couple interpret differently. Such an interpreter helps clients evaluate their ideas or automatic thoughts triggered by their spouse’s actions. Overall, couple CBT helps find alternative ways to look at ideals triggered by the spouse’s actions.

Challenges PMHNPs Might Encounter When Using CBT

One of the challenges in family therapy is feelings of guilt and shame related to disclosure (Reuman et al., 2021). A patient may have self-blame for what caused their mental disturbance or feel guilty of taboo-related obsessional thoughts. This challenge impedes therapy success as the client may conceal information. Another challenge associated with family CBT is criticism and potential refusal to support the affected kin (Reuman et al., 2021). Treatment will likely halt or fail if such a patient depends on the family’s participation to achieve successful therapy. A standard intervention for these family CBT challenges is to reasonably remove a family member from the session (Reuman et al., 2021). Ensuring the client is comfortable, adheres to scheduled therapy sessions, and fully benefits when family members are involved in CBT is essential.

Why Supporting Sources Are Scholarly

Guo et al.: This resource is scholarly because it reports an analysis of research studies on CBT to provide information to professionals.

Moloud et al.: This peer-reviewed article reports on a research study and includes a list of references cited.

Nakao et al.: This resource is scholarly because it was written by experts for healthcare professionals and includes a reference list.

Reuman et al.: A peer-reviewed resource written by experts with a reference list of all sources cited.

References

Guo, T., Su, J., Hu, J., Aalberg, M., Zhu, Y., Teng, T., & Zhou, X. (2021). Individual vs. group cognitive behavior therapy for anxiety disorder in children and adolescents: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 12, 674267.

Moloud, R., Saeed, Y., Mahmonir, H., & Rasool, G. A. (2022). Cognitive-behavioral group therapy in major depressive disorder with a focus on self-esteem and optimism: An interventional study. BMC Psychiatry, 22(1), 299.

Nakao, M., Shirotsuki, K., & Sugaya, N. (2021). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for management of mental health and stress-related disorders: Recent advances in techniques and technologies. Biopsychosocial Medicine, 15(1), 16.

Reuman, L., Thompson-Hollands, J., & Abramowitz, J. S. (2021). Better together: A review and recommendations to optimize research on family involvement in CBT for anxiety and related disorders. Behavior Therapy, 52(3), 594606. Week 5 Discussion:

Comparing CBT in Group, Family, and Individual Settings

Cognitive-behavioral therapy has been used in the management of various mental disorders to correct behavior, improve stress management, and enhance mental health (Nakao et al., 2021). This psychotherapeutic treatment helps individuals identify and shun unhealthy thoughts, hence improving balanced thinking and coping. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) techniques have proved effective when used among patients with anxiety disorders, depression, ADHD, bulimia, smoking, and gambling (Nakao et al., 2021). This post discusses how the implementation of CBT varies in individual, group, and family settings.

Individual CBT offers patients opportunities for individualized therapy to address their specific needs (Guo et al., 2021). This differs from group CBT, which simultaneously offers interventions to a group of patients. Group CBT offers more opportunities for therapeutic peer modeling, social or peer support, normalization, learning from the experiences of others, and behavior reinforcement (Guo et al., 2021). Besides, group CBT saves resources; hence, it is cost-effective. Group CBT is more cost-effective than individual CBT because clients can better share feelings and thoughts to foster interpersonal cooperation (Moloud et al., 2022).

Family CBT involves family members helping address a family-level problem, such as conflicts and poor communication, to reduce symptoms and improve quality of life. Members of a family participating in CBT have a shared understanding of the treatment goals and a strong desire to support them. With family CBT, members can easily support each other to understand psychoeducation delivered on a specific challenge, share knowledge, and understand how to support each other. Involving family in CBT has been associated with better outcomes than individual settings.

In the weeks resources, the therapist explained that in CBT for couples, the therapist has two perspectives to consider. First, it is about focusing on what people have control over. For example, a spouse learns she can control her behavior and how she interprets her husband’s behavior (Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, 2018). As a result, the other spouse may not be able to control one’s behavior or response to another spouse’s behavior. Thus, a spouse understands she cannot control her husband’s behavior but can only have some influence. Another difference seen in couple CBT with other forms is that a couple can practice communication techniques between themselves, such as empathy, paraphrasing, and assertiveness (Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, 2018). Another difference is the presence of someone who can help the couple interpret differently. Such an interpreter helps clients evaluate their ideas or automatic thoughts triggered by their spouse’s actions. Overall, couple CBT helps find alternative ways to look at ideals triggered by the spouse’s actions.

Challenges PMHNPs Might Encounter When Using CBT

One of the challenges in family therapy is feelings of guilt and shame related to disclosure (Reuman et al., 2021). A patient may have self-blame for what caused their mental disturbance or feel guilty of taboo-related obsessional thoughts. This challenge impedes therapy success as the client may conceal information. Another challenge associated with family CBT is criticism and potential refusal to support the affected kin (Reuman et al., 2021). Treatment will likely halt or fail if such a patient depends on the family’s participation to achieve successful therapy. A standard intervention for these family CBT challenges is to reasonably remove a family member from the session (Reuman et al., 2021). Ensuring the client is comfortable, adheres to scheduled therapy sessions, and fully benefits when family members are involved in CBT is essential.

Why Supporting Sources Are Scholarly

Guo et al.: This resource is scholarly because it reports an analysis of research studies on CBT to provide information to professionals.

Moloud et al.: This peer-reviewed article reports on a research study and includes a list of references cited.

Nakao et al.: This resource is scholarly because it was written by experts for healthcare professionals and includes a reference list.

Reuman et al.: A peer-reviewed resource written by experts with a reference list of all sources cited.

References

Guo, T., Su, J., Hu, J., Aalberg, M., Zhu, Y., Teng, T., & Zhou, X. (2021). Individual vs. group cognitive behavior therapy for anxiety disorder in children and adolescents: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 12, 674267.

Moloud, R., Saeed, Y., Mahmonir, H., & Rasool, G. A. (2022). Cognitive-behavioral group therapy in major depressive disorder with a focus on self-esteem and optimism: An interventional study. BMC Psychiatry, 22(1), 299.

Nakao, M., Shirotsuki, K., & Sugaya, N. (2021). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for management of mental health and stress-related disorders: Recent advances in techniques and technologies. Biopsychosocial Medicine, 15(1), 16.

Reuman, L., Thompson-Hollands, J., & Abramowitz, J. S. (2021). Better together: A review and recommendations to optimize research on family involvement in CBT for anxiety and related disorders. Behavior Therapy, 52(3), 594606. Week 5 Discussion:

Comparing CBT in Group, Family, and Individual Settings

Cognitive-behavioral therapy has been used in the management of various mental disorders to correct behavior, improve stress management, and enhance mental health (Nakao et al., 2021). This psychotherapeutic treatment helps individuals identify and shun unhealthy thoughts, hence improving balanced thinking and coping. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) techniques have proved effective when used among patients with anxiety disorders, depression, ADHD, bulimia, smoking, and gambling (Nakao et al., 2021). This post discusses how the implementation of CBT varies in individual, group, and family settings.

Individual CBT offers patients opportunities for individualized therapy to address their specific needs (Guo et al., 2021). This differs from group CBT, which simultaneously offers interventions to a group of patients. Group CBT offers more opportunities for therapeutic peer modeling, social or peer support, normalization, learning from the experiences of others, and behavior reinforcement (Guo et al., 2021). Besides, group CBT saves resources; hence, it is cost-effective. Group CBT is more cost-effective than individual CBT because clients can better share feelings and thoughts to foster interpersonal cooperation (Moloud et al., 2022).

Family CBT involves family members helping address a family-level problem, such as conflicts and poor communication, to reduce symptoms and improve quality of life. Members of a family participating in CBT have a shared understanding of the treatment goals and a strong desire to support them. With family CBT, members can easily support each other to understand psychoeducation delivered on a specific challenge, share knowledge, and understand how to support each other. Involving family in CBT has been associated with better outcomes than individual settings.

In the weeks resources, the therapist explained that in CBT for couples, the therapist has two perspectives to consider. First, it is about focusing on what people have control over. For example, a spouse learns she can control her behavior and how she interprets her husband’s behavior (Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, 2018). As a result, the other spouse may not be able to control one’s behavior or response to another spouse’s behavior. Thus, a spouse understands she cannot control her husband’s behavior but can only have some influence. Another difference seen in couple CBT with other forms is that a couple can practice communication techniques between themselves, such as empathy, paraphrasing, and assertiveness (Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, 2018). Another difference is the presence of someone who can help the couple interpret differently. Such an interpreter helps clients evaluate their ideas or automatic thoughts triggered by their spouse’s actions. Overall, couple CBT helps find alternative ways to look at ideals triggered by the spouse’s actions.

Challenges PMHNPs Might Encounter When Using CBT

One of the challenges in family therapy is feelings of guilt and shame related to disclosure (Reuman et al., 2021). A patient may have self-blame for what caused their mental disturbance or feel guilty of taboo-related obsessional thoughts. This challenge impedes therapy success as the client may conceal information. Another challenge associated with family CBT is criticism and potential refusal to support the affected kin (Reuman et al., 2021). Treatment will likely halt or fail if such a patient depends on the family’s participation to achieve successful therapy. A standard intervention for these family CBT challenges is to reasonably remove a family member from the session (Reuman et al., 2021). Ensuring the client is comfortable, adheres to scheduled therapy sessions, and fully benefits when family members are involved in CBT is essential.

Why Supporting Sources Are Scholarly

Guo et al.: This resource is scholarly because it reports an analysis of research studies on CBT to provide information to professionals.

Moloud et al.: This peer-reviewed article reports on a research study and includes a list of references cited.

Nakao et al.: This resource is scholarly because it was written by experts for healthcare professionals and includes a reference list.

Reuman et al.: A peer-reviewed resource written by experts with a reference list of all sources cited.

References

Guo, T., Su, J., Hu, J., Aalberg, M., Zhu, Y., Teng, T., & Zhou, X. (2021). Individual vs. group cognitive behavior therapy for anxiety disorder in children and adolescents: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 12, 674267.

Moloud, R., Saeed, Y., Mahmonir, H., & Rasool, G. A. (2022). Cognitive-behavioral group therapy in major depressive disorder with a focus on self-esteem and optimism: An interventional study. BMC Psychiatry, 22(1), 299.

Nakao, M., Shirotsuki, K., & Sugaya, N. (2021). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for management of mental health and stress-related disorders: Recent advances in techniques and technologies. Biopsychosocial Medicine, 15(1), 16.

Reuman, L., Thompson-Hollands, J., & Abramowitz, J. S. (2021). Better together: A review and recommendations to optimize research on family involvement in CBT for anxiety and related disorders. Behavior Therapy, 52(3), 594606. COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY: COMPARING GROUP, FAMILY, AND INDIVIDUAL SETTINGS

There are significant differences in the applications of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for families and individuals. The same is true for CBT in group settings and CBT in family settings. In your role, it is essential to understand these differences to appropriately apply this therapeutic approach across multiple settings. For this Discussion, as you compare the use of CBT in individual, group, and family settings, consider challenges of using this approach with groups you may lead, as well as strategies for overcoming those challenges.

RESOURCES

Be sure to review the Learning Resources before completing this activity.
Click the weekly resources link to access the resources.

  • American Psychiatric Association. (2022). (5th ed., text rev.).
    • Culture and Psychiatric Diagnosis
  • Goldenberg, I., Stanton, M., & Goldenberg, H. (2017). Family therapy: An overview (9th ed.) Cengage Learning.
    • Chapter 12, Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Models
  • Wheeler, K. (Ed.). (2020). Psychotherapy for the advanced practice psychiatric nurse: A how-to guide for evidence-based practice (3rd ed.). Springer Publishing.
    • Chapter 8, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
    • Chapter 21, Psychotherapeutic Approaches with Children and Adolescents
      • pp. 793802 only
    • Chapter 22, Psychotherapy with Older Adults
      • pp. 840844 only

Wemino

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a brief kind of psychotherapy that focuses on altering one’s cognition to promote and sustain behavioral changes. Cognitive and behavioral therapy (CBT) is a scientifically supported approach for treating mental problems. In CBT, the therapist assists the patient in recognizing and rectifying incorrect and unproductive ideas. (Clevenger, 2022). Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) centers on the interplay between ideas, emotions, and behaviors. It operates on the premise that our thoughts and beliefs have a direct impact on our feelings and actions (Lebow, 2022). Cognitive Behavioral treatment (CBT) may be administered via several modalities, such as individual treatment, couple therapy, family therapy, and group therapy. The choice of format will vary based on the shown symptoms, the preferences of the client, and the advice of the therapist. (Lebow, 2022).

Individual therapy provides a private and secure environment for patients to openly communicate with their therapist, ensuring that they may share personal information without concerns of being overheard or interrupted by others. CBT in an individual context often entails personalized sessions between the therapist and the client, focusing on the client’s particular issues, objectives, and difficulties. Also, CBT sessions are customized to meet the specific requirements of each client and may use approaches such as cognitive restructuring, behavioral experiments, and problem-solving skills training.
The client and therapist uncover negative thinking patterns and behaviors, create coping techniques, and establish feasible therapeutic objectives. Finally, individual CBT provides for a thorough examination of the client’s individual experiences, emotions, and beliefs, resulting in a more tailored approach to therapy. (Guo et al., 2021).
Family therapy is a kind of treatment where a therapist assists two spouses in resolving relationship challenges. It is particularly useful when there is concurrent relationship discomfort (Lebow, 2022). Family CBT sessions are aimed at identifying and altering problematic patterns of interaction and communication within the family system. Assisting families with CBT has proven useful because it can be experimented on during sessions. The therapist in this weeks video for couples cited examples that during CBT sessions, couples can learn to practice communication techniques, empathy, and paraphrasing each others words. Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy. (2018, June 7). Moreover, the therapist helps family members resolve disagreements, create limits, and develop empathy. Finally, family CBT handles family conflict, parent-child interactions, and family dynamics’ effects on mental health.
In group therapy, multiple people with comparable problems, such as drug misuse, anxiety, or depression, commonly engage in CBT in a group environment. Secondly, group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) sessions generally adhere to a well-defined framework, whereby the therapist guides conversations, imparts psychoeducation, and oversees group exercises and activities. Group members engage in the exchange of their experiences, provide mutual support, and gain insights from one other’s viewpoints, which can cultivate a feeling of togetherness and validation. Lastly, group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be especially advantageous for people who get advantages from peer assistance, social engagement, and the chance to use and refine new abilities in a nurturing setting. (Pessagno, 2022).
Two challenges PMHNPs might encounter when using CBT in one of these settings.
Individual Therapy
Problems arising from lack of time and resources are a real possibility for PMHNPs providing care in individual settings. Assessing, formulating, intervening, and evaluating are all steps that take time when providing thorough CBT. A further difficulty in individual settings is dealing with customers who are resistant or unengaged. Clients who are initially hesitant or who have preconceived ideas about treatment may find it challenging to grasp or embrace the concepts of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). (Wild, 2021).
Family Therapy
Family CBT performed by PMHNPs may face difficulties stemming from complicated family dynamics, such as patterns of communication, disputes between generations, and power struggles. Secondly, family members’ reluctance or inconsistent levels of willingness to participate in treatment are two potential obstacles that families face. Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioners (PMHNPs) may face difficulties in motivating hesitant family members to fully engage and cooperate in the treatment process. (Roberts et al., 2014).
Group Therapy
PMHNPs who facilitate group CBT may have difficulties in controlling group dynamics, such as interpersonal disputes, disturbances, or persons who assert excessive control. Secondly, addressing individual needs: Every participant in group therapy has distinct requirements, objectives, and obstacles. Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioners (PMHNPs) may have difficulties in effectively managing the balance between personalized therapies for individuals and the overall aims and objectives of the group. (Pessagno, 2022).
In conclusion, PMHNPs must demonstrate robust clinical skills, adaptability, and cultural competency to successfully tackle these issues and provide high-quality CBT therapies that cater to the requirements of their clients.
References
Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy. (2018, June 7). CBT for couplesLinks to an external site.Links to an external site. [Video]. YouTube. to an external site.
Clevenger, S. M. (2022). Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. In K. Wheeler (Ed.), Psychotherapy for the advanced practice psychiatric nurse: A how-to guide for evidence-based practice (3rd ed.; pp.
643-687). Springer Publishing Company, LLC
Guo, T., Su, J., Hu, J., Aalberg, M., Zhu, Y., Teng, T., & Zhou, X. (2021). Individual vs. Group Cognitive Behavior Therapy for anxiety disorder in children and adolescents: A meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Frontiers in psychiatry, 12, 674267.
Lebow, J. (2022). Overview of psychotherapies. UpToDate, Topic 14612 Version 32.0.

Pessagno, R. (2022). Group therapy. In K. Wheeler (Ed.), Psychotherapy for the advanced practice psychiatric nurse: A how-to guide for evidence-based practice (3rd ed.; pp. 643-687). Springer Publishing Company, LLC
Roberts, J., AbuBaker, K., Diez Fernndez, C., Chong Garcia, N., Fredman, G., Kamya, H., … & Zevallos Vega, R. (2014). Up close: Family therapy challenges and innovations around the world. Family Process, 53(3), 544-576.
Wild, W. (2021). Addressing Clinician and Client Barriers to Cognitive Behavior Group Therapy. Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy. https://beckinstitute.org/blog/addressing-clinician- and-client-barriers-to-cognitive-behavior-group-therapy/Links to an external site.


MondayMar 25 at 11:15am

Week 5 Discussion:

Comparing CBT in Group, Family, and Individual Settings

Cognitive-behavioral therapy has been used in the management of various mental disorders to correct behavior, improve stress management, and enhance mental health (Nakao et al., 2021). This psychotherapeutic treatment helps individuals identify and shun unhealthy thoughts, hence improving balanced thinking and coping. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) techniques have proved effective when used among patients with anxiety disorders, depression, ADHD, bulimia, smoking, and gambling (Nakao et al., 2021). This post discusses how the implementation of CBT varies in individual, group, and family settings.

Individual CBT offers patients opportunities for individualized therapy to address their specific needs (Guo et al., 2021). This differs from group CBT, which simultaneously offers interventions to a group of patients. Group CBT offers more opportunities for therapeutic peer modeling, social or peer support, normalization, learning from the experiences of others, and behavior reinforcement (Guo et al., 2021). Besides, group CBT saves resources; hence, it is cost-effective. Group CBT is more cost-effective than individual CBT because clients can better share feelings and thoughts to foster interpersonal cooperation (Moloud et al., 2022).

Family CBT involves family members helping address a family-level problem, such as conflicts and poor communication, to reduce symptoms and improve quality of life. Members of a family participating in CBT have a shared understanding of the treatment goals and a strong desire to support them. With family CBT, members can easily support each other to understand psychoeducation delivered on a specific challenge, share knowledge, and understand how to support each other. Involving family in CBT has been associated with better outcomes than individual settings.

In the weeks resources, the therapist explained that in CBT for couples, the therapist has two perspectives to consider. First, it is about focusing on what people have control over. For example, a spouse learns she can control her behavior and how she interprets her husband’s behavior (Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, 2018). As a result, the other spouse may not be able to control one’s behavior or response to another spouse’s behavior. Thus, a spouse understands she cannot control her husband’s behavior but can only have some influence. Another difference seen in couple CBT with other forms is that a couple can practice communication techniques between themselves, such as empathy, paraphrasing, and assertiveness (Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, 2018). Another difference is the presence of someone who can help the couple interpret differently. Such an interpreter helps clients evaluate their ideas or automatic thoughts triggered by their spouse’s actions. Overall, couple CBT helps find alternative ways to look at ideals triggered by the spouse’s actions.

Challenges PMHNPs Might Encounter When Using CBT

One of the challenges in family therapy is feelings of guilt and shame related to disclosure (Reuman et al., 2021). A patient may have self-blame for what caused their mental disturbance or feel guilty of taboo-related obsessional thoughts. This challenge impedes therapy success as the client may conceal information. Another challenge associated with family CBT is criticism and potential refusal to support the affected kin (Reuman et al., 2021). Treatment will likely halt or fail if such a patient depends on the family’s participation to achieve successful therapy. A standard intervention for these family CBT challenges is to reasonably remove a family member from the session (Reuman et al., 2021). Ensuring the client is comfortable, adheres to scheduled therapy sessions, and fully benefits when family members are involved in CBT is essential.

Why Supporting Sources Are Scholarly

Guo et al.: This resource is scholarly because it reports an analysis of research studies on CBT to provide information to professionals.

Moloud et al.: This peer-reviewed article reports on a research study and includes a list of references cited.

Nakao et al.: This resource is scholarly because it was written by experts for healthcare professionals and includes a reference list.

Reuman et al.: A peer-reviewed resource written by experts with a reference list of all sources cited.

References

Guo, T., Su, J., Hu, J., Aalberg, M., Zhu, Y., Teng, T., & Zhou, X. (2021). Individual vs. group cognitive behavior therapy for anxiety disorder in children and adolescents: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 12, 674267.

Moloud, R., Saeed, Y., Mahmonir, H., & Rasool, G. A. (2022). Cognitive-behavioral group therapy in major depressive disorder with a focus on self-esteem and optimism: An interventional study. BMC Psychiatry, 22(1), 299.

Nakao, M., Shirotsuki, K., & Sugaya, N. (2021). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for management of mental health and stress-related disorders: Recent advances in techniques and technologies. Biopsychosocial Medicine, 15(1), 16.

Reuman, L., Thompson-Hollands, J., & Abramowitz, J. S. (2021). Better together: A review and recommendations to optimize research on family involvement in CBT for anxiety and related disorders. Behavior Therapy, 52(3), 594606.